Mista Skee

11 Sep 2006 1,112 views
 
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photoblog image In the Land of Low Light

In the Land of Low Light

You know you are seeing such a photograph if you say to yourself, "I could have taken that picture. I've seen such a scene before, but never like that." It is the kind of photography that relies for its strengths not on special equipment or effects but on the intensity of the photographer's seeing. It is the kind of photography in which the raw materials:- light, space, and shape, are arranged in a meaningful and even universal way that gives grace to ordinary objects. -Sam Abell, "Seeing and Shooting Straight" by Sam Abell

IN THE LAND OF LOW LIGHT
Something that I've always found interesting since beginning my photographic journey is taking pics in low light situations (Concerts, theatre productions etc) where no flash is allowed.

I always used to find it funny, back in the day, when, in a large hall or auditoria, the person next to me would whip out a camera and try to take a picture of the performer on stage and trigger off the camera's puny built in flash. Come to think about it, I also did this a couple of times too. The results were always the same, a dark stage and a bleached out portrait of the back of the head of the person standing in front of me. Ever seen a bleached out bald headed man…not the prettiest of sights. I used to think, if only I had a stronger flash, good job I didn't as I most probably would have blinded everyone on the stage and be serving time for manslaughter.

Now I know better, or I like to think I do, after all 'perfect practise' makes 'perfect'. But in the land of fast lenses, high ISO's, Image Stabilization, and sensitive digital camera bodies, it is now possible for almost anybody to take a decent low-lighted photograph, well almost.

I personally, love the challenges "The dark side" brings, of course, there are still days when things go totally wrong, but every outing is a step up the ladder in terms of learning and there is definitely things to learn from ones mistakes or as I like to call them, " experiments" lol.

TODAY'S SHOTS!

I love strong contrasting images, as they make excellent monotones. I decided on doing a study of shooting through crowds at a concert to see what interesting shapes I could come up with. I like to call this the "Keyhole effect", it's something I strongly recommend you all have a go at.

I shoot, for those of you wondering, most of my lowlight shots, with any lens that can stop down to f2.8 and I'm lucky enough to have now a camera that has no restrictions with shooting at ISO 1600 and possibly 3200 (acceptable noise here)

So what are you waiting for, get cracking, hopefully this will inspire someone somewhere to "Take a walk on the dark side" with little ol' Skee.

More low light concert work can be found in my archives, any questions email me or simply leave a comment.

It's another week, welcome to Skeetown everybody.


In the Land of Low Light

You know you are seeing such a photograph if you say to yourself, "I could have taken that picture. I've seen such a scene before, but never like that." It is the kind of photography that relies for its strengths not on special equipment or effects but on the intensity of the photographer's seeing. It is the kind of photography in which the raw materials:- light, space, and shape, are arranged in a meaningful and even universal way that gives grace to ordinary objects. -Sam Abell, "Seeing and Shooting Straight" by Sam Abell

IN THE LAND OF LOW LIGHT
Something that I've always found interesting since beginning my photographic journey is taking pics in low light situations (Concerts, theatre productions etc) where no flash is allowed.

I always used to find it funny, back in the day, when, in a large hall or auditoria, the person next to me would whip out a camera and try to take a picture of the performer on stage and trigger off the camera's puny built in flash. Come to think about it, I also did this a couple of times too. The results were always the same, a dark stage and a bleached out portrait of the back of the head of the person standing in front of me. Ever seen a bleached out bald headed man…not the prettiest of sights. I used to think, if only I had a stronger flash, good job I didn't as I most probably would have blinded everyone on the stage and be serving time for manslaughter.

Now I know better, or I like to think I do, after all 'perfect practise' makes 'perfect'. But in the land of fast lenses, high ISO's, Image Stabilization, and sensitive digital camera bodies, it is now possible for almost anybody to take a decent low-lighted photograph, well almost.

I personally, love the challenges "The dark side" brings, of course, there are still days when things go totally wrong, but every outing is a step up the ladder in terms of learning and there is definitely things to learn from ones mistakes or as I like to call them, " experiments" lol.

TODAY'S SHOTS!

I love strong contrasting images, as they make excellent monotones. I decided on doing a study of shooting through crowds at a concert to see what interesting shapes I could come up with. I like to call this the "Keyhole effect", it's something I strongly recommend you all have a go at.

I shoot, for those of you wondering, most of my lowlight shots, with any lens that can stop down to f2.8 and I'm lucky enough to have now a camera that has no restrictions with shooting at ISO 1600 and possibly 3200 (acceptable noise here)

So what are you waiting for, get cracking, hopefully this will inspire someone somewhere to "Take a walk on the dark side" with little ol' Skee.

More low light concert work can be found in my archives, any questions email me or simply leave a comment.

It's another week, welcome to Skeetown everybody.


comments (9)

  • nev
  • Australia
  • 11 Sep 2006, 00:10
the smoke/dust, silhouttes and contrasts are great.
Mr Skee: thanks nev... hope the commentary was useful too smile
  • ........
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Sep 2006, 00:17
Do you go to KT ?
  • ........
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 11 Sep 2006, 00:30
Yeah Kind of -u look like the dude who takes pics at Royal Albert Hall etc etc - He usually wears glasses though ...

If thats you - woo! Hoo! I know a celebrity !
Mr Skee: So now you can put a name to the face smile next time you see me stop and say hi smile. Who are you anyway? smile
  • Offie
  • my paddie pad pod!!!
  • 11 Sep 2006, 00:42
~Interesting concept!!Framing or is it layout ... kind of works for me!!
Mr Skee: thanks... smile
  • Suby
  • MK, UK
  • 11 Sep 2006, 00:48
Not bad bro, I like shooting in low light, just means I have a good ecuse for keeping my shots on the dark side. Seems we had a similar theme tonight :d

Suby
Mr Skee: lol, thanks... but how dark can you go ;-) smile
  • atunbi
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Sep 2006, 01:30
I hear you skee, but you still upgraded ya 10D, so why you go and do dat...(am singing).. Its nice but I want the skee of yesterday's shot. KNOCK OUT IMAGES. You dig?
Mr Skee: really doesn't matter what camera, i've shot similar with my powershot G2 and my 10D. smile. The photographer Sam Abell once said "It matters little how much equipment we use; it matters much that we be masters of all we do use!"

My shot on Saturday in my opinion was what I could call a "Safe Shot', cos it posed really no difficulties to me and it was not really challenging in that regard. smile Skee has little value for such shots smile

Everything I take a picture of, I try to think of it as a new invention for someone to see. If it comes out perfect it is because I put my heart into it. And if the viewer likes it, it is because his or her heart and emotions accepted it. -Anonymous

smile that's todays "Food for thought", I'm off to bed as usual, thanks for coming by. let me go and check your blog before I sleep ;-)
  • The enforcer
  • alpha quadrant
  • 11 Sep 2006, 11:21
U have a talent
  • chris p
  • United Kingdom
  • 11 Sep 2006, 19:01
Excellent smile
  • shiv
  • India
  • 27 Nov 2006, 09:56
nice shots,
really like the first one,
anyhow,could you tell me a little about low light,
i have a d100,usually use a 80-200mm 2.8 ED
how do you deal with the noise at high levels?
(i have a gig shoot coming up and i really need to do well,it could be a big break,my first paid shoot...!!)

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